Hispanic or Latino? —Yes, No, and None of-the-above.

When I was filling out a job application on Workday, I came across the following question and was profoundly confused. I normally just quickly select no between the yes-and-no, but this time...I wonder what the survey collector will learn about the applicant from the third option: "None of the above.

hispanic or latino.jpg

Always curious of topics on diversity and cultures as such, I didn't want to assume anything before learning more about it. 

According to Wikipedia (entry: "Hispanic-Latino naming dispute), 

The usage of both terms has changed to adapt to a wide range of geographical and historical influences. The term "Hispanic" was used first; later, some Hispanics in the western United States came to prefer the term "Latino".

Why do job applications ask for this though? I found some responses on reference.com and discussions on Quora

These memes also educated me on understanding the differences between the terms "Hispanic", "Latin@," "Spanish," and more.

Well, back to UX design: the following examples is not user-friendly in terms of how they apply buttons for different purposes. In Q15, (compared to Q16,) if they want survey takers to select only one answer, it implicates that the two answers are mutually exclusive: they should use a Radio Button. In Q16, the current use of Checkboxes is justified. 

survey2.jpg

To learn more about the use of Radio Buttons and Checkboxes, see https://www.nngroup.com/articles/checkboxes-vs-radio-buttons/